To Have and To Hold

A Funeral for Fun

During recess at school, the children have fun pretending to hold a funeral for Sam Houston. Creed Allen, as the preacher, liberally praises the Lord as everyone "mourns" the loss of their dear friend. Creed tells everyone that he, too, used to enjoy life but then he found religion and life ceased to be a pleasure. As Christy watches and laughs over their antics, David walks by and asks her to meet him at the pond tomorrow after supper. Creed urges everyone to gather round and observe how natural their departed brother looks. Ruby Mae, in an academy award winning performance, throws her weeping body upon the "departed," awakening him from the "dead." Little Burl interrupts the ceremony and urges Christy to follow him. When they peek underneath the schoolhouse, they discover Lundy, who is sleeping in the crawlspace with the pigs. Lundy had run away months ago when everyone assumed that he had shot Tom McHone. Christy never thought that she would see him again . . .

Two Against One

After examining Lundy, Neil gives a diagnosis of severe expose to malnutrition and advises complete bed rest and decent food. David points out that the boy isn't likely to receive either at his father's house but Neil advises him that keeping Lundy at the mission would be asking for trouble. David doesn't agree and says that the purpose of the mission is to help and he doubts Lundy would hurt anyone in his present condition. When Neil again advises against keeping Lundy there, David asks Christy for her opinion. Closing the door to the shed where Lundy is sleeping, Christy agrees that the boy should stay . . .

Taylor Made Visitor

The next morning, Christy brings Miss Alice a cup of coffee out to the garden where she is working. Christy asks Alice her opinion about Lundy. Miss Alice tells Christy that when she first came to Cutter Gap, before the mission or church was built, Lundy was just a small tow-headed boy. When the little boy grew bigger than everyone else, he discovered that he could have his own way. The little boy was soon replaced by a bully. When Christy points out that Lundy's father beats him, Miss Alice tells her that most of the mountain people who have evil done to them, do evil in return. Christy agrees and recalls how Lundy tried to destroy the schoolhouse when she first arrived in Cutter Gap. She believed that his father forced him to do it but perhaps it was Lundy's own doing. Miss Alice asks Christy if she is having second thoughts about Lundy staying at the mission and Christy wonders if the boy shouldn't be punished for what he did to Tom McHone. Alice points out that Lundy has been without a home for months with little to eat and no human companionship. That is punishment enough for anyone. When Christy admits that she sometimes hates Lundy for what he did, Alice tells her that feuding starts with that kind of thinking. She advises Christy to practice forgiveness. Miss Alice is startled when Birds-Eye emerges from behind the bushes. Mr. Taylor asks the ladies if they have Lundy and Alice informs the man that his son is ill and that they are caring for him until he recovers. Birds-Eye tells Alice that the Taylors take care of their own and marches toward the shed to retrieve his son. David plants himself firmly in front of Birds-Eye and asks the man if he can be of assistance. When Birds-Eye tells the preacher that he has come to get his son, Alice informs Mr. Taylor that it isn't that simple. Birds-Eye tells Alice that it is very simple indeed . . .

The Mission or the Moonshiner

Alice strokes Lundy's forehead and tells the boy that his father has arrived to take him home. She tells him that she believes he would be better off at the mission but that Birds-Eye has agreed to let him make the decision. Lundy tells Alice that he wants to stay where he is and she agrees that it would be for the best. She turns from Lundy's bed and announces to Birds-Eye that Lundy should be well enough to return home in a few weeks . . . if he chooses. Birds-Eye heads for the door then stops, turns and asks Lundy if he is sure about his decision. He tells his son that they could make things different this time and that he would treat him better. Lundy sticks with his original choice and Birds-Eye leaves . . .

A Surprise Proposal

Christy, who is wearing a crisp white dress with her hair loosely tied with a bow, rushes to meet David at the pond. David, who is dressed in his Sunday best and is wearing a tie, offers Miss Huddleston his arm and asks if he might offer her tea. She tells "Mr. Grantland" that she would be delighted and takes his arm. They stroll over to the piazza which is furnished with a table covered with a white cloth and silver tea set. As David pulls the chair out for Christy, he apologizes for the lack of lemon and cream. Christy assures him that plain tea will be just fine. Christy is enthralled by David's efforts and David admits that he wanted to do "it" properly. He is certain that she had hundreds of boys swarming around her in Asheville but Christy assures him that a hundred is an exaggeration. When David points out that her beaus probably knew more about courting than he does, Christy asks if "courting" is what David is doing. David stares at her and finally admits that it is. He moves his chair closer to Christy's and pulls out a small blue pouch that is tied with a ribbon. He removes a ring and tells Christy that the jewel belonged to his grandmother and her great-grandmother before that. Christy admires the ring and David tells her that it is a real emerald. When David finally asks if she will marry him, Christy just stares at him . . .

I've Got a Secret

The next morning, Christy sits on the balcony outside her room and admires her ring. It is her very first offer of marriage and she is touched, flattered, and very confused. She feels as if she has grown up over night. Ruby Mae gasps when she sees the ring, smiles and tells Christy that she's never seen that particular piece of jewelry before. She tries to grab the ring but Christy snatches it away from the girl's probing fingers. Ruby Mae tells Christy that she knew David was in a courting mood when she saw him wearing his suit and tries to get Christy to admit that David proposed to her. Christy is noncommittal but her smile gives her secret away. Ruby Mae excitedly hugs her but Christy tells the girl that she must keep the proposal a secret as she hasn't given David an answer yet. Ruby Mae looks crestfallen at the idea of keeping such a delectable piece of information to herself but finally agrees. After Ruby Mae leaves, Christy tries the ring on for size . . .

Looking Out For Lundy

Christy is admiring her ring when Ida walks by and tells Christy that she hopes she is up to wearing a ring that belonged to two extraordinary women. Christy sees Isaac perched on the hill and asks the boy what he is up to. When Isaac doesn't answer Christy wonders if it has something to do with Lundy. Isaac admits that he is looking out for his family. Lundy shot his daddy and he might try and hurt him again. Christy informs the boy that Lundy is much too sick to hurt anyone but Isaac continues his whittling and doesn't answer. Christy tells him that if Lundy did indeed hurt his father she's sure that he is sorry. Isaac unconvincingly agrees . . .

All About Marriage

Christy disapproves of Burl's attempts to wash himself and informs the boy that he must clean behind his ears. When Creed wonders why he needs to learn long division when short seems good enough Christy tells the boy that it is exercise for his mind like climbing a tree is to his body. A giggling Ruby Mae and company gather around Christy and enquire about the subject of marriage. When Christy asks for specifics, Ruby Mae asks her how to be a good wife. Reading their adolescent minds, Christy points out that being a good wife is much more than JUST what they are thinking. She looks at Zady and asks her if she's ever met anyone who cares more for her children or works harder than her mother. Zady admits that she hasn't. Christy tells the two that it is wonderful to fall in love with a boy and kiss and tell each other secrets but marriage is a life time commitment that takes two people who truly respect each another. Neil overhears her speech and agrees with her. When he asks Christy how she got on the subject of marriage Christy plays dumb. He tells her that he is going to be in Low Gap for a few days and asks her if she will miss him. Christy is stunned that the doctor would ask such a question but Neil teasingly clarifies himself, explaining that he was only wondering if she would be able to manage taking care of Lundy while he was away. Christy assures the man that she will and he bids her farewell. As he leaves, Christy has an impulse to confide in him about David's proposal. She is confused over her desire to do so as Neil and her proposal from David have absolutely nothing to do with one another . . .

A Sudsy Battle

Fairlight and Ida have a disagreement over the correct procedure to make soap. Ida tells Fairlight that she put too much lye in the kettle and insists that more water is required. Fairlight tells Ms. Grantland that she always makes it this way and tries to stop Ida from pouring more water into the soap. The two ladies struggle over the bucket, each getting a good dosing of water upon themselves. A gentleman arrives in the middle of their soap squabble and introduces himself as Clarence Sweetwater. Upon hearing Clarence's name, Ida faints on the ground . . .

Ida Has a "Sweet" Heart

David chats with Clarence while Christy and Fairlight try to revive Ida. Clarence tells David that he and Ida have been corresponding for over a year. He sent her a picture of himself but Ida obviously didn't recognize him as the picture was taken a few pounds ago. He tells David that the two of them have never met in person, only through their letters. He has a feed and grain business in Knoxville that made a little money over the years but he's always wanted to go out west and start a family. He just never met the right woman. So, he placed an ad in the newspaper and Ida replied, saying that she was interested in marriage with a refined gentleman. Of course, Clarence wrote her back saying that he wasn't refined but had possibilities. Christy asks Ida if she's okay and dazedly Ida informs her that she is. David asks Clarence why he came to Cutter Gap and Mr. Sweetwater tells him that he has a chance to buy an orange grove in California. He wrote and told Ida about his opportunity and she agreed to marry him. Ida winces and shuts her eyes. Clarence admits that he was supposed to arrive last week but had the flu. He was sure that Ida had given up on him. David excuses himself and asks to speak to his sister alone. David asks Ida when she was going to tell him about her impending marriage and Ida tells him that she was trying to find the courage to do so. David points out the fact that his sister doesn't even know the man. Ida says that she does know Clarence from his letters. When David tells Ida that it isn't like his sister to agree to marry a total stranger, Ida tells her brother that he doesn't have a clue as to whom she is. She has always been the dutiful daughter who took care of everyone else. After her trip to Boston, she realized that her mother would be happy if she did that the rest of her life and that wouldn't be a life. David continues to insist that it would be crazy to marry a man that she's just met. Sobbingly, Ida points out that there isn't anyone else for her to marry. David apologizes but tells Ida that he cannot allow her marriage to take place. Ida tells her brother that it is her decision but David, as her eldest male relative, will not allow it, unless he feels that Clarence Sweetwater is good enough for her . . .

Lovers Quarrel

Fairlight and Christy are smiling in the kitchen as they watch Ida serve supper to Clarence, who is humming a little ditty. Ida returns to the kitchen and in her giddiness, almost trips climbing the stair. She tells Christy that when she was a child she imagined her husband sitting at the table just as Clarence is now. Christy tells Ida that she always pictured her husband playing lions and tigers in front of the fire with a little girl or boy. She smiles and tells Ida that she thinks Mr. Sweetwater is very nice indeed. Ida thanks Christy for her kinds words and wishes her brother felt the same way. Christy goes outside where David is lounging on the porch. He smiles and asks Christy if she has something to tell him. Christ admits that she does and tells him that she feels he is wrong about his decision concerning his sister and Clarence. David tells Christy that he has a responsibility toward his sister and Christy wonders if it's because he wears trousers. When David responds that his sense of responsibility stems from the fact that he cares about his sister Christy enquires as to why it's okay for him to marry her without speaking to anyone. David points out that, unlike Ida, Christy didn't pick a man out of a newspaper. Christy agrees. She just simply fell into his arms during a thunderstorm! Suddenly, David wants to know why the two of them are shouting and Christy turns to go back into the mission, unable to figure out why. Fairlight meets her at the door with a tray of food for Lundy. When Christy remarks that this is Lundy's fourth meal of the day, Fairlight wonders if the boy has a tapeworm or just isn't as sick as he says he is. Christy heads over to the shed with the tray and Fairlight gives David an exasperated look . . .

Lunch With Lundy

Lundy is holding a gun and staring out the window. When he sees Christy coming with the tray, he jumps into bed and covers the gun with the blanket. Christy enters with the tray and tells the boy that he can quit pretending to be asleep as she knows that he is awake. Lundy grabs the bowl of stew and starts shoveling it into his mouth as if he hadn't eaten in weeks. Christy takes the bowl away from him and starts to feed him from a spoon. She tells Lundy that she missed him while he was gone and that everyone was worried about him. She asks him if he ran away because he shot Tom McHone. Lundy adamently denies shooting the man but Christy tells him that she understands why he did it, because he got caught up in the feud and began listening to the lies his father told him about the McHones. Lundy again denies shooting Tom or anyone else for that matter. He tells Christy that she won't trap him into admitting that he did. Christy denies that she is trying to get him to admit that he shot Tom but Lundy doesn't believe her, saying that she and everyone else would like to see someone go to jail for the shooting. He tells her that it isn't going to be him because he is innocent. He grabs the bowl away from her and resorts to the caveman's method of eating once more. Christy insists that she isn't out to punish him and leaves. Lundy throws the remains of his dinner at the door as it closes . . .

The Inquisition

Ida is strolling across the field and carrying an umbrella to shade herself from the heat of the sun. Meanwhile, David and Clarence are working up a sweat as they saw away at a rather large pine tree. After questioning Clarence about his plan to support Ida, his life insurance policies, religious affiliation, and debts, David hits the important topic of former wives and fiances. Ida decides that David has gone far enough with his line of questioning and announces that it is time for lunch. She asks the two if fried chicken and apple cobbler will do, pointing out that even a mule needs food and Clarence certainly has worked harder than one himself. David agrees to stop for a while and Ida and Clarence stroll into the shade where a picnic lunch has been laid out. Clarence apologizes for bringing up the subject of marriage, but tells Ida that he has to be in California next week. Ida realizes that the two would have to be married in a few days but points out that she wouldn't have time to get anything ready nor would her mother be able to travel from Boston in time for the wedding. Clarence apologizes again but tells Ida that California is his last dream. When Ida admits that her life's dream has always been her wedding Clarence asks her if she is turning his proposal down. Ida tells Clarence that she doesn't know what she is going to do . . .

She Walks in Beauty

In the schoolhouse, Christy is dreamily sketching a picture of David. She strolls outside where David greets her with a reading of poetry by Lord Byron. David tells Christy that he doesn't understand how the man could have written the poem without meeting her. He takes Christy's hand, kisses it and tells her that God must have given the poet a vision. Christy, duly charmed, apologizes for being angry with David. They kiss and Christy, flustered, hurries off to the mission in the wrong direction . . .

A Difficult Decision

Christy is leaning on the fence outside of the mission staring into space. Alice remarks upon Christy's quietness at dinner but Christy tells her that she had nothing to say. Christy asks Alice her opinion about marriage and tells Ms. Henderson about David's proposal. David, who would like to be married right away, has agreed to let her continue teaching the school in Cutter Gap after their marriage until he has to move to another mission. Alice asks Christy what she wants but Christy has no answer. She tells Alice that sometimes she feels that she is really in love with David and would like nothing better than to start a family. But, on the other hand, she feels that she is too young to get married, the children in Cutter Gap need her, and then there is Neil. When Alice wonders what Neil has to do with her hesitation to marry David, Christy explains that Neil wants to make a difference in the cove as much as she does. David comes out of the mission and stares at the two ladies. At the sight of David, Christy blushes and tells Alice that when she thinks about Mr. Grantland it's hard for her to think at all. She asks Alice what she should do about David's proposal but Alice tells her that she cannot answer that question for her. Only Christy can know the answer, not in her mind or body, but inside her heart . . .

Mistaken Identity

Lundy is awakened by the creak of a footstep on the stair outside. He looks out the window and sees the back of a man with a gun. He cocks his gun and aims toward the door. As the door slowly opens, he calls out but receives no reply. When he sees the barrel of a gun in the doorway he shoots just as Birds-Eye pushes Isaac out of the way. Christy is awakened by the gunshot and runs downstairs to find Miss Alice, David, Isaac and Lundy gathered around an injured Birds-Eye. Lundy apologizes profusely, claiming that it was an accident, that he only borrowed David's gun to protect himself from a possible retaliation by Isaac. Christy is furious when Isaac states that Lundy's shooting of his father is justice served. She wonders if the boy heard anything that she's been teaching about feuding. When David tells Alice that Neil is in Low Gap, she tells him that there isn't time to notify him and nominates Christy to be her assistant in surgery. As Alice tries to retrieve the bullet, Christy holds open the edges of the wound . . .

A Manly Lesson

Christy finds Isaac sitting outside on the mission steps and informs him that Birds-Eye's status is unknown. She tells Isaac that being a man doesn't mean feuding and killing. When Isaac points out that Lundy shot his father and deserves to be punished, Christy tells him that being a man means that you are strong enough to forgive, not strong enough to shoot a gun. She asks the boy how he thinks his parents would have felt if Lundy had been killed. Isaac apologizes and tells Christy that she must be disappointed in him as she worked so hard to teach her students about the wrongness of feuding. Christy hugs Isaac and tells him that she could never be disappointed in him . . .

Protectful Papa

Christy finds Lundy stewing on a hill in the mountains. She chastises him for being outside, pointing out that he still isn't well. Lundy asks Christy about his father's condition but Christy has no definite answer. Lundy tells Christy that his father was watching out for him when he followed Isaac to the shed . . .

Something Good From the Bad

Christy tells Lundy that God knew that the shooting was an accident. That night, Christy sees an amazing sight. Lundy is kneeling beside his father's bed praying to God for his recovery . . .

An Angry Awakening

The next morning, Lundy, who is still perched beside his father's bed, is awakened by his father's stirrings. He excitedly calls for Christy, yelling to her that his father has come to. Lundy apologizes to his father for shooting him, saying that he was unaware of his identity and didn't realize that he was looking out for him. Birds-Eye orders Lundy to get away from him and tells the boy that he is no son of his . . .

Stamp of Approval

Lundy, who is standing outside in the pouring rain, peers in the window and watches as Neil examines his father. Neil compliments Alice on her surgical technique and Alice points out that Christy, too, deserves praise for her assistance. On his way out, Neil praises Christy for her work as well . . .

You Know Me So Well

An umbrella in hand, Christy follows Neil outside and tells how heartbreaking it was to see Birds-Eye push Lundy away. When Neil tells her that the mountain men don't show their feelings easily, Christy points out that Lundy is his son. Neil comments on her passionate interest in Lundy and wonders what her stake is in the situation. Neil goes on to suggest that Christy wants Birds-Eye to forgive his son so that she can forgive him too. As Neil rides away, Christy wonders how Neil was able to determine what she was thinking before she herself even knew. Once again he was able to see into her heart . . .

To Ida With Love

Ida pounds on the door to Fairlight's cabin and tells her that she doesn't have time to play childish games. Fairlight opens the door and reveals Ruby Mae, Miss Alice, and a table laden with gifts. Fairlight tells a stunned Miss Ida that they realized that she wouldn't be able to get the necessary items from Boston in time for her wedding so they gathered together a few things for her trousseau. Fairlight presents Ida a lovely quilt that Aunt Polly made before she died, three crocks of Opal McHone's apple butter, a ladle that was hand carved by her father in Ireland, a hand-embroidered scarf from Christy and a dozen candles from herself, made from Jeb's finest beeswax. Alice tells a speechless Ida that they wanted her wedding to be a special occasion and Fairlight, noting Ida's silence, expresses her hope that they haven't overstepped their boundaries. Ida tearfully thanks the group and tells them that everything is simply lovely . . .

Brotherly Blessing

Ida finds David down by the pond staring at Clarence, who is standing on the other side. She tells her brother that she doesn't need his permission to marry Clarence as she is a grown woman who is over thirty. David reminds Ida that she is still his sister, the same woman who bandaged his knees when he fell and scraped them and listened to him practice his first sermon. He tells Ida that he only wants the best for her, for her to marry someone who can give her everything that she truly deserves. Ida tells David that Clarence is offering her his devotion and a great adventure, something that she isn't sure that she deserves but is grateful for the chance to have it. Ida points out that she doesn't need David's permission to marry Clarence but would like his blessing and for him to perform the ceremony. David smiles and tells his sister that it would be his pleasure . . .

A Change of Heart

Christy knocks on the door to Birds-Eye's room and asks permission to enter. Once inside, Christy brings up the subject of Lundy. Birds-Eye tells her that the only subject that interests him concerning his son is his punishment. Christy can't believe that Birds-Eye would press charges against his own son but Birds-Eye tells her that Lundy will be sorry for what he did to him. Lundy, who has been lurking in the distance, leaves the mission after hearing the hurtful words. Christy tells Birds-Eye that his son didn't mean to hurt him and that he's a scared boy who needs a father, not someone who hits him and tells him how worthless he is. When Birds-Eye points out that Lundy doesn't care for him anyway, Christy contradicts him, saying that his son loves him very much and would like to talk to him. Birds-Eye reluctantly nods his permission and Christy runs outside to tell Lundy the good news. Lundy avoids Christy and runs off into the woods as his as father watches from the window in his room. Christy is afraid that this time, Lundy is gone for good . . .

Not Now David

At "Lover's Lake", David gazes into Christy's eyes and tells her how much he loves her determination. He assures Christy that Lundy will return home as his ties to Cutter Gap are as strong as hers are. Christy tells David that she can't marry him for Lundy made her see just how much the children need her and she needs them. She hands him the ring and tells him that her rejection doesn't mean she will never marry him, it just means no for now. David kisses Christy and tells her that he's not giving up . . .

A Jewel of A Gesture

When David runs into Ida outside the mission, he asks her the whereabouts of her fiance. Ida has no idea for it would be bad luck for her to see her future husband before the wedding. David shows Ida the ring and tells her that he wants to give it to Clarence so that he can give it to his bride . . .

To Have and To Hold

The bride walks across the mission yard to her waiting groom as Hattie McHabe's beautiful voice sings a song of a perfect love. Neil interrupts Christy's fantasy about her wedding to David and asks if the spot next to her is taken. Christy informs the good doctor that he is just in time as David begins reciting the marriage vows . . .

Caroline Kent